An Associate in Science (AS) degree in Environmental Sciences prepares students for transfer to a university and is intended for students pursuing a career in fields such as environmental consulting, natural resource management, science education, or graduate school in the sciences. Students may choose an Applied Geology Emphasis or a Biology Emphasis. Students may complete a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree with a Biology Emphasis entirely at Northern Arizona University-Yuma. The Applied Geology Emphasis requires transfer to NAU in Flagstaff or elsewhere for the BS degree.

Graduates of the Environmental Sciences – Applied Geology Emphasis program will successfully complete the following learning outcomes:

  • Prepare and interpret graphs, maps, and diagrams of geologic data
  • Identify and explain the origins of minerals and rocks
  • Describe the inter-relationships between geology and the other areas of science
  • Become informed of the one-world concept of geological processes affecting humanity
  • Be familiar with the various technical tools used by environmental scientists including GIS, GPS, remote sensing and other mapping tools and describe how these various tools work together to assist environmental biologists
  • Describe the nature of scientific inquiry and be able to identify when research, monitoring, or taxonomy is appropriate to apply to environmental issues
  • Describe pollution and the processes of Earth's atmosphere

Graduates of the Environmental Sciences – Biology Emphasis program will successfully complete the following learning outcomes:

  • Explain the interdependence of all species and the importance of biological diversity in the functioning of the biosphere
  • Explain why microbes are vital to life on Earth
  • Be familiar with the various technical tools used by environmental scientists including GIS, GPS, remote sensing and other mapping tools and describe how these various tools work together to assist environmental biologists
  • Describe the nature of scientific inquiry and be able to identify when research, monitoring, or taxonomy is appropriate to apply to environmental issues
  • Discuss the role of biological diversity in the functioning of ecosystems

Programs

Click on a program to get more information.

Environmental Sciences (Applied Geology Emphasis)

Recommended Program Map / Program Requirements

The recommended plan below meets the requirements to complete this program.  For official requirements, visit the AWC Catalog. If the recommended classes listed below don’t fit your schedule or interests, you can take alternate classes. 

Visit Academic Planning to get started on your personalized Academic Plan, or schedule an appointment with the Advising Office.

Program Requirements Based on Fall/Spring rotation  (AGEC-S certificate also included)

First Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
GLG 101 Introduction to Geology 1 (Physical) 4 Departmental Requirement
MAT 150183
or
MAT 151 & 183
or
MAT 187 *
College Algebra w/ ReviewPlane Trigonometry
or
College Algebra: Standard & Plane Trigonometry
or
Precalculus *
5+2
or
4+2
or
5
Pre-requisite for MAT 220 
(counts towards elective credits)
ENG 101 
or
ENG 107
Freshman Composition I 3 GE-Composition
ART Choose one course from Arts 3 GE-Arts
HUM Choose one course from Humanities 3 GE-Humanities
  * MAT 187 has a pre-requisite of MAT 121 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 18-20  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Second Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
GLG 102 Introduction to Geology 2 (Historical) 4 Departmental Requirement
MAT 220 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry 5 GE-Mathematics
ENG 102 
or
ENG 108
Freshman Composition II 3 GE-Composition
CHM 151 General Chemistry I 4 GE-Physical & Biological Sciences
    16  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Third Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
ENV 230 Foundations of Environmental Science 4 Major Requirement
CHM 152 General Chemistry II 4 GE-Physical & Biological Sciences
PHY 111 College Physics I  4 Departmental Requirement
SOC Choose one Writing Intensive course from Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 GE-Social & Behavioral Sciences (Writing Intensive)
    15  

Milestones:

  • If transferring, apply to universities

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Fourth Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
ENV 280 Physical and Chemical Processes in the Environment 4 Major Requirement
MAT 230 Calculus II with Analytic Geometry 5 Departmental Requirement
MAT 270 Applied Statistics 4 Co-Requisite for ENV 280 (counts towards elective credits)
GLG 240 Introduction to Field Method and Report Writing 2 Departmental Requirement
SOC Choose one Writing Intensive course from Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 GE-Social & Behavioral Sciences (Writing Intensive)
    18  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

  • Attend Etiquette Lunch
  • Meet with Career Services
  • Apply for university scholarship opportunities  

Environmental Sciences (Biology Emphasis) – Degree

Recommended Program Map / Program Requirements

The recommended plan below meets the requirements to complete this program.  For official requirements, visit the AWC Catalog. If the recommended classes listed below don’t fit your schedule or interests, you can take alternate classes. 

Visit Academic Planning to get started on your personalized Academic Plan, or schedule an appointment with the Advising Office.

Program Requirements Based on Fall/Spring rotation  (AGEC-S certificate also included)

First Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
BIO 181 General Biology I 4 Departmental Requirement
MAT 150183
or
MAT 151 & 183
or
MAT 187 *
College Algebra w/ ReviewPlane Trigonometry
or
College Algebra: Standard & Plane Trigonometry
or
Precalculus *
5+2
or
4+2
or
5
 
Pre-requisite for MAT 220 
(counts towards elective credits)
ENG 101 
or
ENG 107
Freshman Composition I 3 GE-Composition
ART Choose one course from Arts 3 GE-Arts
HUM Choose one course from Humanities 3 GE-Humanities
  * MAT 187 has a pre-requisite of MAT 121 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 18-20  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Second Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
BIO 182 General Biology II 4 Departmental Requirement
MAT 220 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry 5 GE-Mathematics
ENG 102 
or
ENG 108
Freshman Composition II 3 GE-Composition
CHM 151 General Chemistry I 4 GE-Physical & Biological Sciences
    16  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Third Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
ENV 230 Foundations of Enviromental Science 4 Major Requirement
BIO 205 Microbiology 4 Departmental Requirement
CHM 152 General Chemistry II 4 GE-Physical & Biological Sciences
SOC Choose one Writing Intensive course from Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 GE-Social & Behavioral Sciences (Writing Intensive)
    15  

Milestones:

  • If transferring, apply to universities

Co-Curricular Requirements:

Fourth Semester

Course Course Title Credits Area
ENV 280 Physical and Chemical Processes in the Environment 4 Major Requirement
GPH 213 Introduction to Climate Science 4 Departmental Requirement
MAT 270 Applied Statistics 4 Departmental Requirement
SOC Choose one Writing Intensive course from Social & Behavioral Sciences 3 GE-Social & Behavioral Sciences (Writing Intensive)
    15  

Milestones:

Co-Curricular Requirements:

  • Attend Etiquette Lunch
  • Meet with Career Services
  • Apply for university scholarship opportunities  

Transfer Paths and Requirements

UNIVERSITY DEGREE MAJOR LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Arizona State University BS Biology (Environmental Science) None
Northern Arizona University BS Biological & Natural Resource Sciences None
University of Arizona  BS Environmental Science: The Biosphere Emphasis: 2nd Semester Proficiency

Transfer Tools

AZTransfer Logo

AZTransfer will provide you with more information and tools on how to transfer to ASU, NAU, and UofA.

Need help with transferring?  The AWC Transfer Services office can provide you with individualized help to explore degree pathways and specific university requirements.  Visit their website or schedule an appointment with a transfer specialist.  

Career Overview & Job Outlook

Successful completion of this program may lead to a variety of employment opportunities, most of which require continued higher education at the university level. Below are examples of related occupations and annual mean wages in Arizona according to a May 2020 State Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates Report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Forest and Conservation Technicians 
Provide technical assistance regarding the conservation of soil, water, forests, or related natural resources. May compile data pertaining to size, content, condition, and other characteristics of forest tracts under the direction of foresters, or train and lead forest workers in forest propagation and fire prevention and suppression. May assist conservation scientists in managing, improving, and protecting rangelands and wildlife habitats. 
$40,630
Biological Technicians 
Assist biological and medical scientists. Set up, operate, and maintain laboratory instruments and equipment, monitor experiments, collect data and samples, make observations, and calculate and record results. May analyze organic substances, such as blood, food, and drugs.
$41,930
Fish and Game Wardens
Patrol assigned area to prevent fish and game law violations. Investigate reports of damage to crops or property by wildlife. Compile biological data.
$42,260
Geological Technicians
Assist scientists or engineers in the use of electronic, sonic, or nuclear measuring instruments in laboratory, exploration, and production activities to obtain data indicating resources such as metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum. Analyze mud and drill cuttings. Chart pressure, temperature, and other characteristics of wells or bore holes.
$44,690
Hydrologic Technicians
Collect and organize data concerning the distribution and circulation of ground and surface water, and data on its physical, chemical, and biological properties. Measure and report on flow rates and ground water levels, maintain field equipment, collect water samples, install and collect sampling equipment, and process samples for shipment to testing laboratories. May collect data on behalf of hydrologists, engineers, developers, government agencies, or agriculture.
$44,690
Environmental Engineering Technologists and Technicians
Apply theory and principles of environmental engineering to modify, test, and operate equipment and devices used in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental problems, including waste treatment and site remediation, under the direction of engineering staff or scientists. May assist in the development of environmental remediation devices.
$52,330
Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists
Study the origins, behavior, diseases, genetics, and life processes of animals and wildlife. May specialize in wildlife research and management. May collect and analyze biological data to determine the environmental effects of present and potential use of land and water habitats.
$63,710
Conservation Scientists
Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering.
$66,530
Geographers
Study the nature and use of areas of the Earth's surface, relating and interpreting interactions of physical and cultural phenomena. Conduct research on physical aspects of a region, including land forms, climates, soils, plants, and animals, and conduct research on the spatial implications of human activities within a given area, including social characteristics, economic activities, and political organization, as well as researching interdependence between regions at scales ranging from local to global.
$72,750
Hydrologists
Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; and study the form and intensity of precipitation and its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and return to the ocean and atmosphere.
$78,440
Geoscientists
Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, and oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists.
$83,900
Environmental Engineers
Research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology.
$92,640
Biochemists and Biophysicists
Study the chemical composition or physical principles of living cells and organisms, their electrical and mechanical energy, and related phenomena. May conduct research to further understanding of the complex chemical combinations and reactions involved in metabolism, reproduction, growth, and heredity. May determine the effects of foods, drugs, serums, hormones, and other substances on tissues and vital processes of living organisms.
$101,940
Natural Sciences Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.
$121,900

Contact Information

Joann Chang
Associate Dean, Science
(928) 344-7665
Office: AS 117
Laura Alexander
Professor of Environmental Science
(928) 317-6302
Office: BA 218
Jacob Gibson
Professor of Environmental Science
(928) 317-7610
Office: AS 124