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Student HEALTH Services

NEW LOCATION:COTTAGE #1

Campus Nurse Available
Monday-Thursday 7:30am-3:00pm
Immunizations Monday - Thursday 8:00am-3:00pm
Closed from 12 noon-12:30pm

Nurse's Direct Line: (928) 317-6121
Office Phone: (928) 344-7602
FAX: (928) 344-7723

Student Health Services Mission Statement

AWC Student Health Services (SHS) believes a student must maintain physical and behavioral health to achieve academic success. To accomplish this goal, AWC SHS promotes healthy lifestyles to emphasize safety and to prevent disease and injury by providing nursing services and health/wellness education to encourage students to take responsibility for their own lifelong health decisions. It is through innovative partnerships with the Yuma Community our student population can improve in their medical and mental well-being which will assist in their academic achievements.

Behavioral Health screening now available on-line

Research reports that 45 percent of students felt hopeless at least once during the past year (ACHA 2011). Behavioral Health Screening raises awareness and educates students about the signs and symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders, as well as connecting at-risk students to the resources they need. Students, faculty, and staff can receive a free, confidential screening that takes only about three minutes.

Taking periodic stock of your emotional well-being can help identify warning signs of common ailments like depression or anxiety. Such illnesses are highly treatable, especially when they are identified in their early stages, before they get so severe that they precipitate some sort of personal — and perhaps financial — crisis.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/depression/DS00175

Take the screening to learn about your health.
Visit http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org/screening/.
Use the keyword: Arizona

Student Flu Shots $12
Please click on the "Flu Prevention" link on the upper left corner of our page for more information on the signs and syptoms of the flu.

Improve your health - Walking is a low-impact exercise with numerous health benefits. Here's how to get started.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Benefits of walking
Walking, like other exercise, can help you achieve a number of important health benefits. Walking can help you:

  • Lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol)
  • Raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol)
  • Lower your blood pressure
  • Reduce your risk of or manage type 2 diabetes
  • Manage your weight
  • Improve your mood
  • Stay strong and fit

Learn more walking tips including preparation, using the right gear, warming up, stretching, etc., by clicking on the far right download “Walking Info.”You may also utilize the “Campus Walking Trails” and track your progress with our “Walking Log.”Happy Trails!

 

WebMD’s 13 Best Quit Smoking Tips

No. 1: Know Why You Want to Quit
So you want to quit smoking, but do you know why? "Because it's bad for you" isn't good enough. To get motivated, you need a powerful, personal reason to quit. Maybe you want to protect your family from secondhand smoke. Maybe the thought of lung cancer frightens you. Or maybe you'’d like to look and feel younger. Choose a reason that is strong enough to outweigh the urge to light up.

No. 2: Don't Go Cold Turkey
It may be tempting to toss your cigarettes and declare you've quit, plain and simple. But going cold turkey isn't easy to do. Ninety-five percent of people who try to stop smoking without therapy or medication end up relapsing. The reason is that nicotine is addictive. The brain becomes used to having nicotine and craves it. In its absence, the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal occur.

No. 3: Try Nicotine-Replacement Therapy
When you stop smoking, nicotine withdrawal may make you feel frustrated, depressed, restless, or irritable. The craving for "just one drag" may be overwhelming. Nicotine-replacement therapy can help reduce these feelings. Studies suggest nicotine gum, lozenges, and patches can help double your chances of quitting successfully when used with an intensive behavioral program. But using these products while smoking is generally not recommended.

No. 4: Ask About Prescription Pills
To ease nicotine withdrawal without using products that contain nicotine, ask your doctor about prescription medications. There are pills that help reduce cravings by affecting chemicals in the brain. They may also make smoking less satisfying if you do pick up a cigarette. Other drugs can help reduce troubling withdrawal symptoms, such as depression or inability to concentrate.

No. 5: Don't Go It Alone
Tell your friends, family, and co-workers that you're trying to quit. Their encouragement could make the difference. You may also want to join a support group or talk to a counselor. Behavioral therapy is a type of counseling that helps you identify and stick to quit-smoking strategies. Combine behavioral therapy with nicotine replacement products and/or medication to boost your odds of success

No. 6: Manage Stress
One reason people smoke is that the nicotine helps them relax. Once you quit, you’ll need another way to cope with stress. Try getting regular massages, listening to relaxing music, or learning yoga or tai chi. If possible, avoid stressful situations during the first few weeks after you stop smoking.

No. 7: Avoid Alcohol, Other Triggers
Certain activities may boost your urge to smoke. Alcohol is one of the most common triggers, so try to drink less when you first quit. If coffee is a trigger, switch to tea for a few weeks. And if you usually smoke after meals, find something else to do instead, like brushing your teeth or chewing gum.

No. 8: Clean House
Once you've smoked your last cigarette, toss all of your ashtrays and lighters. Wash any clothes that smell like smoke and clean your carpets, draperies, and upholstery. Use air fresheners to help rid your home of that familiar scent. You don't want to see or smell anything that reminds you of smoking.

No. 9: Try and Try Again
It's very common to have a relapse. Many smokers try several times before giving up cigarettes for good. Examine the emotions and circumstances that lead to your relapse. Use it as an opportunity to reaffirm your commitment to quitting. Once you've made the decision to try again, set a "quit date" within the next month.

No. 10: Get Moving
Physical activity can help reduce nicotine cravings and ease some withdrawal symptoms. When you want to reach for a cigarette, put on your inline skates or jogging shoes instead. Even mild exercise is helpful, such as walking the dog or pulling weeds in the garden. The extra calories you burn will also ward off weight gain as you quit smoking.

No. 11: Eat Fruits and Veggies
Don't try to diet while giving up cigarettes -- too much deprivation is bound to backfire. Instead, focus on eating more fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products. A Duke University study suggests these foods make cigarettes taste terrible. This gives you a leg up in fighting your cravings while providing disease-fighting nutrients.

No. 12: Choose Your Reward
In addition to the tremendous health benefits, one of the perks of giving up cigarettes is all the money you will save. Reward yourself by spending part of it on something fun.

No. 13: Do It for Your Health
There's more than the monetary reward to consider. Smoking cessation has immediate health benefits. It lowers your blood pressure and reduces your pulse after only 20 minutes. Within a day, the carbon monoxide level in your blood returns to normal. Within two weeks to three months, your risk of a heart attack decreases and your lungs begin to function better. Long-term benefits include a reduced risk for coronary heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, and other cancers.

Related Reading
Tips for Healthy Living
Tool: Are You Ready to Quit Smoking?
Unusual Ways to Quit Smoking
The First 30 Days: Quit Smoking!
7 Tips to Quit Smoking for Good
User Reviews of Smoking-Cessation Aids
WebMD Video: How to Quit Smoking
Smoking-Cessation Support Group

EVENTS:

May 5th 10a-4p 3C Courtyard; Arrive Alive Tour
UNITE’s Arrive Alive program uses a high-tech simulator, impact video, and a number of other resources to educate students about the dangers of drunken driving and texting while driving. The simulator allows students to experience the potential consequences of drunken and distracted driving in a controlled environment.  Their programs are designed to heighten awareness to the dangers and consequences of drunken and distracted driving. Their follow-up programs have a powerful impact on students to reinforce the subjects that schools and parents teach them daily. One of the most commonly recognized driving distractions is cell phone use. About 89 percent of all Americans have a cell phone, according to CTIA – The Wireless Association. Drivers under 20 years old have the highest proportion of distraction-related fatal crashes according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Their lack of driving experience can contribute to critical misjudgments if they become distracted. Not surprisingly, they text more than any other age group, and the number of young drivers who text is only increasing. 

 

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